06 December, 2009

"...written with an assurance and style that seem like the product of years of published writing experience"

“I find it hard to believe that this is Glasner’s first novel; it’s written with an assurance and style that seem like the product of years of published writing experience–far removed from so many first novels.”

~~A Review of Finding Emmaus by Hugh Ashton, December 5th, 2009~~

A book review that started through Twitter. A fellow-tweeter and author (who happens to live only two stations up the line from me here in Japan), Christopher Belton, wrote a review of a first novel by Pamela Glasner that piqued my curiosity and, thanks to his review, I ordered it from Amazon. He has since interviewed Glasner, who talks more about the book here.

Described as a “dark historic fantasy” on the book’s Web site, Finding Emmaus is far removed from the “sword and sorcery” type genre (Glasner complains that she is often asked if her books are “like Harry Potter”. They’re not.). It actually tells the stories of two lives, running in parallel, but separated by several hundred years. Francis (”Frank”) Nettleton, scion of a wealthy 17th-century Colonial family, discovers the truth about his fits of seeming depression (his “dark days”) which, as he finds out more, turns out also to be the truth about a surprising number of people, who go about their lives in a state of terror–the terror that comes from the results of being diagnosed as insane or possessed by the devil; torture or death at the hands of the self-appointed cleansers of society.

Katherine Spencer, a 21st-century property developer, finds herself troubled by the many of the same fears as Frank, and finds herself being drawn closer and closer to him as she flees from the 21st century’s equivalent of Bedlam–the psychotropic drugs overprescribed by doctors in an attempt to cure what is seen by the medical industry as mental illness.

As the story progresses, the results of Frank’s life work, his Lodestarre (guide) to aid those who are cursed or blessed with the special gift of Empathy, becomes a near-obsession with Katherine and those around her as she settles into the house where Frank lived and worked centuries before.

The plot twists and turns through the lives of Katherine and those around her, taking in the lives and passions of her friends, the bombshell she explodes under the US pharmaceutical industry, and the diagnosis and treatment of mental patients. Since Glasner has described Finding Emmaus as the first of a trilogy, I did discover that the end of the book leaves a number of loose ends untied (good – it makes me want to read the rest of the series) but rushes somewhat to tie up others, compared with the more leisurely pace of the rest of the book.

When I first started reading, I found the style a little difficult to get into – not that it’s self-consciously literary, but it’s very much more concerned with characters’ interior thoughts and feelings than my usual reading fare. On reading further, it’s obvious why this is so–the plot is so concerned with characters’ interior lives that the story had to be told from the inside.

Although I do understand why this has to be the case, I found Frank’s 17th-century persona to be too 21st-century, and his language to be too close to our own present-day dialect for my taste, at least. Although it’s hard to read, and harder to write, in a style similar to (say) Pepys or Defoe for extended periods, Frank’s language, as well as his 21st-century sensibilities and reactions, jarred at times with the little I know of that period of American history and society.

One writer’s works with which I might compare Finding Emmaus are those of Robertson Davies; in its historical sweep, involving a broad cast of characters spanning different periods, and with an emphasis on the spiritual, books such as Murther and Walking Spirits come to mind. I find it hard to believe that this is Glasner’s first novel; it’s written with an assurance and style that seem like the product of years of published writing experience–far removed from so many first novels.

The physical book itself caught my eye as an example of the bookmaker’s art. Glasner apparently chose many of the design features herself; for example, the chapter headings are backed by a faint underprinting of a 17th-century manuscript. The typeface is clear and adds a classic feeling without being self-consciously Olde Worlde (and the dreaded fake deckle edge has been avoided). Maybe book design doesn’t mean that much when ebooks seem poised to take over the world, but for those of us who grew up with sliced dead trees, this is a good example of what can and should be done to match the physical book with the contents.

So, my main question now is: when are the next two volumes coming out? I know that Glasner has another project bubbling away, but I hope that Katherine and Frank aren’t being pushed too far onto the back burner. I’m looking forward to finding out what happens next (and isn’t that the ultimate test of what makes a good book?).

~~Hugh Ashton, author of Beneath Gray Skies~~


02 December, 2009

Pamela's words are what Computer Graphic Imaging is to the movies!

What an amazing book. Pamela explains in ‘Author’s Notes’ on how the story is a figment of her imagination, but she utilizes historical characters from America’s past, making her story more intriguing and even more fascinating.

This is a book that you just can’t put down. You will be right on the edge of your seat as she mentions various towns that are descriptive of real American towns on the East Coast. Pamela knows how to pull on America’s heart strings via her readers.

The heroes of this book are Francis Nettleton and Katherine Spencer, both empaths. Here is the doozy that will have you hooked: both empaths live three hundred years apart, but yet their lives are interconnected. Right in the beginning of this book, you can feel your adrenalin rush as Katherine is terrified after hearing the front door opening and slamming repeatedly, the motor for the lift starts and the lift keeps ascending, loud footsteps are heard, sounds of breaking glass and Katherine mustering up all of her strength as she yells out … “there’s no such thing as ghosts!”

As the story proceeds along at an exhilarating pace, you will learn about a character named Gilbert Bond that is Empathic, but the doctors misdiagnosed poor Gilbert. Gilbert is finally forcibly escorted to the Bethlem Royal Hospital. Gilbert starts a diary and when you read the diary, you will learn about the atrocities that were placed upon him. How he faced torture and humiliation. How pitch is thrown upon his body, how he screams in excruciating pain. How three brutish men shave his hair off and cut into his scalp repeatedly. The tortures continue and the reader is left with vivid images in their mind.

Pamela definitely knows how to play this story out as if it were a blockbuster motion picture! Pamela’s words are what CGI (Computer Graphic Imaging) is to the movies! This story is filled with references to not only historical characters, but even to sayings from movies like The Confession.

There is a mystery around every corner and it will even have you front and center with a government agency like the Center for Disease Control.

Yep! When I say this book is intriguing …I am dead serious! Finding Emmaus is not only a good read, but it also leaves strong images in my mind that will linger with me for a long time afterwards!

~~By Paul Dale Roberts, December 2nd, 2009~~
Reviewer and President of Jazma Online

08 November, 2009

Another 5-Star Review: "A Book You Can't Put Down"

A book you can't put down..., November 8, 2009
By Debra A. Killian "The Mortgage Lady" (Connecticut)

Finding Emmaus is an exceptional read. I want to know everything about how this story came about. How did Ms. Glasner decide on these incredible characters? Has she met any Empaths? How could she so brilliantly write about their world?

While a work of fiction, I couldn't help but think about the reality of prescription drugs and the effect on our society. Her message is consistently articulated throughout the events she creates. I wanted to read ahead, instead I savored every word. How did she know these people from so long ago? Who were the inspirations for her characters?

This book kept me on a good edge, made me question my own emotions and believe that woven into this fiction, are traits, thoughts and experiences every reader can identify with. I loved her descriptiveness and choice of words; her creative concept that life altering events can happen "in between heartbeats."

Pamela Glasner's first book is without a doubt a must read and I look forward to the next in the series.


Of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

05 November, 2009

Finding Emmaus - an inspiring saga of which Michael Crichton would have been proud


“Finding Emmaus”
By Pamela S.K. Glasner
ISBN: 978-1-934572-33-7

Review by Christopher Belton
Reviewer and Author of more than 40 fiction and non-fiction books

The promotional blurb for
Finding Emmaus touts it as being a ‘dark fantasy,’ but this, in my opinion, does it a disservice, for it is much, much more. It is an inspiring saga of history, adventure, religion, politics, suspense, mystery and romance, all neatly wrapped up in a compelling conspiracy of which Michael Crichton would have been proud to have conceived. Admittedly, the plotline does touch upon certain aspects that could be considered paranormal in substance, but the overall effect of the book does not leave the reader with an aftertaste of ‘fantasy,’ but rather of having been introduced to a disturbing reality that will generate a slight sense of inadequacy for not having been aware of the problem before.

Finding Emmaus is a story about empaths; people who are naturally gifted—or cursed—with the ability to feel the emotions of others as acutely as if they were experiencing them themselves. Although encased within a single volume, the reader is in fact treated to two separate tales that evolve three and a half centuries apart, but which are intricately woven together with a common thread that is empathy. The plot examines the lives of two people—Francis (Frank) Nettleton and Katherine Spencer—who have both been troubled since birth by the gift/curse of empathy, albeit in different ways. Frank is a product of the seventeenth century, during which any form of eccentricity was diagnosed as madness or devil-worship and dealt with severely. Katherine, on the other hand, is a product of the more enlightened twentieth century, yet the lack of any clinical method to diagnose empathy has resulted in her being treated as a manic depressive and poisoned with expensive drugs that have no hope of providing her with solace or a cure. The tragedy of the empaths induces Frank to do something about it, and in order to complete his life’s work, he reaches across the centuries and recruits Katherine to his cause.

Ms. Glasner is an exceedingly capable writer who has managed to consistently incorporate two distinct styles of writing within the same book; a feat that would be beyond the reach of most authors. Frank’s story is written in the first person, and when this is put together with Katherine’s story, which is written in the third person, the reader is left with the impression that the book has been co-authored by Ms. Glasner and Frank himself. The historical atmosphere of the early settler days of Connecticut rings especially true, and the warmth that the prose exudes speaks volumes about the author’s love of her subject.

One point that I found particularly impressive—and of which I write with envy—is the way in which the book starts.
Ms. Glasner has attained the Holy Grail of fiction by writing an opening that is so compelling that I defy anybody to read it and then put the book aside; as follows:
The year is 2008. I am, as I have been for the past two
hundred and fifty-one years, ninety-eight years old.

If pressed to criticize the book, I would have to say that I was a tad disappointed that the conspiracy concerning pharmaceutical companies was not developed further as the book drew to a conclusion, but if I were to be honest with myself, I would probably put this down to the fact that I just didn’t want the book to end. It was a great read and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Finding Emmaus is Ms. Glasner’s first novel, yet it contains all of the elements that could be expected of a much more experienced author. I am sure that I will not be the sole reader who is deeply thankful that it represents only the first book in the Lodestarre Series.

And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

30 October, 2009

Sharing 'Finding Emmaus' in Essex, Connecticut & Webster, Massachusetts

Author Pamela Glasner talks about her new novel, Empathic personalities, madness and the indisputable human right of free will

The psychiatric community has confused Empathic personality traits with mental illness with tragic results. This unsettling historical fantasy, Finding Emmaus, takes the reader on a harrowing 350-year fictional yet factual journey through the history of treatment for the mentally ill, eventually exposing a multi-billion dollar conspiracy in which millions of Americans are being misdiagnosed and drugged for no other reason than the enormous income they generate.

Author Pamela Glasner will discuss the present and historical treatment of the mentally ill, what it means to be an Empath, the stranglehold the pharmaceutical industry has on the American population and how all of that came together in this dark, unsettling book.

Saturday, November 14th from 1:00PM to 3:00PM
Booklover's Gourmet
55 East Main Street
Webster, MA, 01570
Debra Horan - owner
508-949-6232 – phone

Sunday, November 15th from 3:00PM – 4:00PM
Essex Books2 Essex SquareHistoric Essex VillageEssex, CT 06426
Sue McCann - owner
860-767-1707 - phone
I would very much like you to be there if at all possible — it’s so much better when I can enjoy this with people I know and care about!

A special thank you goes out to Debra Horan of Booklover’s Gourmet and Sue McCann of Essex books in advance for their interest, generosity and hard work – both of these promise to be a great events!

And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

23 October, 2009

Authors and Arachnids

I’m thinking about doing a series of blogs on all the sleazy predators out there who have no particular talent themselves beyond the ability to zero in on their preferred victim: an up-and-coming hopeful with wishes and dreams, someone who possesses a sacred, God-given gift to write or paint or sing or act, but more importantly, possesses a wallet. I've heard those predators referred to as sharks, snakes, vultures, leaches, creatures lower than whale dung, but in my mind’s eye, I see a being whose body is dominated by one simple body part: the open hand. And who’s got more hands than a spider?

If you think about it, the arachnid really does conjure up the perfect image. It can sit down beside you, cross its legs and still have six appendages available to dangle carrots, rifle your belongings, stroke your ego and feel around in your pockets all at the same time — and still have two hands left-over: one proffering the pen with which to sign on the dotted line, the other covering its mouth so it can simultaneously hide the drool and the gluttonous smile.

And where’s the harm? After all, it’s not asking you for all of your life savings, just a portion of it — in advance, please. But it’s okay, it croons, as it begins spewing platitudes and sugar-coated venom, it’s such a pittance in comparison with the jewels I will one day lay at your feet: ten minutes on Oprah, sixteen column inches in the New York Times, a Hollywood contract, the Nobel Peace Prize and, on your way to the Pearly Gates, nothing short of canonization.

Now I want to ask you a question: has the following ever happened to you?

You go to the dentist and he informs you that you need a lengthy, expensive, invasive procedure known as a root canal. You’re in pain so, obviously, you agree to go ahead with it, but you’re apprehensive. You’ve never had one, you don’t know what it’s going to be like, you don’t know what you’re going to feel like. Of course you’re going to do it, you’re just nervous. And then it happens.

Every Tom, Dick and Harry, every butcher, baker and candlestick maker in your life and dozens of them who are not in your life are suddenly in your face telling you that they, too, had a similar experience. When you got out of bed that morning, you didn’t know anyone who’d ever had a root canal but by suppertime dental patients were crawling out of the woodwork.

You know what I mean. Even if it’s not about the dentist, it’s still happened to you, right? An insurance claim, a car accident, a delayed flight, a bad meal at a good restaurant. Whatever the circumstances, for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. We’ve all experienced the same phenomenon: If it’s happened to you, it’s happened to a dozen others who never once thought to mentioned it before, but suddenly have an overwhelming need to tell you all about it now.

That’s how I know I’m not alone when I say I spend a good portion of my time dodging the sharks and the snakes and the vultures. In fact, I’m in very good company. “Everywhere you turn,” sings Sarah McLachlan, “there's vultures and thieves at your back.” Wannabe’s — people who wannabe nothing more than in my checkbook.

And it really is a shame. It’s a sad commentary on humanity that no matter how much we evolve, we will always be divided up between the predator and the prey; we will always have to contend with shallow, hollow, miserable leaches who have nothing to give and therefore nothing to lose and therefore no problem devastating the dreams of the talented, the dedicated, the idealistic — as long as they get to line their pockets.

I've been up most of the night thinking about one such predator in particular, a person working overtime to ooze their way into my life with brazen demands of unfettered access and dubious promises of silver and gold and riches beyond imagining. I’m grateful I've been blessed with this gift worth coveting, and I’m equally grateful I've been blessed with the wherewithal to recognize a well-disguised arachnid when I see one, and I know that I will, along with the rest of us who have something of value to offer the world, spend the rest of my life en guard. I just can’t help but sigh in frustration when I think about it. Such a waste of good energy.

Oh, one final thing: Yes, I know — the way an arachnid’s body is structured, it cannot actually sit like humans do, but it makes a heck of a good image, doesn’t it?


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

19 October, 2009

Finding Gratitude – Celebrating the Birth of Finding Emmaus

I love talking about my book. Can’t help it — no point in dissembling or trying to deny it. Anyone who knows anything about me, or has spoken with me for even five minutes, will tell you that. I also love addressing a crowd — as long as I’m passionate about the subject matter. So, when October 8th rolled around, I was absolutely in all my glory. After all, what could I possibly be more passionate about than my new ‘baby’, my novel, Finding Emmaus?

It’s funny: I expected the day to be somehow different. Not sure how, just different. Perhaps everything outside would look clearer, more sharply defined. Perhaps the air would feel crisper or the sun would shine brighter or my bagel would taste better. I read once, a long time ago, that life-altering events “come in on cat’s paws” and I know that to be true. I don’t tend to walk around blinded by rose-colored glasses, but still … I couldn’t help but think, deep in that little girl’s heart of mine, that it might have been nice for the universe to stand up, even for a moment, and take just a little more notice … if only enough so that maybe walking the dog would take on some new, prophetic meaning.

But the universe did not cooperate … and, frankly, neither did the dog.

No matter. It was a lovely day and by the time the evening rolled around, I was excited but relaxed and confident and above all, deeply grateful for all I've been blessed with.

There’s no reason for any of this to have happened. Outside of my degree, which says I’m a high school English teacher, I've no formal training to be a writer. I had no résumé with which to wow a potential agent or publisher; I did not have an office wall papered with rejections or a bookshelf full of unwanted manuscripts and I certainly was not living the life of a starving artist. All I did was spend three days in a monastery at a silent retreat and, in the absence of external noise, I dug deep down inside myself and found the voice that’s apparently been clambering for my attention for nearly fifty-six years.

They say things come in threes and I think maybe that’s so, for I now celebrate three births: my new granddaughter, my new book, and this miraculous but strange new woman I have become. I love her, I’m just spending a little extra time in the “sizing her up” stage of our relationship.

Coincidentally (and I don’t believe it coincidences!) it looks as though The Lodestarre Series will be a trilogy.

The Book Launch Celebration was a great success. Friends I’d spoken with but had not actually seen in thirty-eight years drove in from New Jersey and Washington DC just to be with me. Beth Devlin, the events coordinator for the Wallingford Public Library, outdid herself. The publicity was excellent, the room was beautiful, and Beth herself was cool as a cucumber and the consummate professional. She managed everything so smoothly, the evening just couldn’t have been better.

I've a lot to be grateful for. And a lot to look forward to. And wonderful people in my life to depend on and celebrate with. And all I can think to say is “Thank God.”

You can read a preview of my book, the first three chapters, here.

Finding Emmaus is now available in the UK through
Amazon, as well as in the US in these fine independent bookstores: Burgundy Books, Essex Books, Powell’s Books.


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

13 October, 2009

Author Event Coming This Week

On Thursday, October 15, 2009 at Burgundy Books in East Haddam, Connecticut, at 6:30 PM, I will be introducing my new book, Finding Emmaus and talking about my writing experiences and how Finding Emmaus came to print. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing at the conclusion of the program.

Burgundy Books is owned and run by Linda Williams and is located at:
4 Norwich Road
East Haddam, CT 06423.

The phone number is 860 873-9312. If possible, if you could register in advance, that would be great.I'd love to see you there – especially if you were unable to make the Book Launch in Wallingford. http://www.burgundybooks.net/Pamela_Glasner.html

Please feel free to invite a friend with you or pass this invitation along to anyone whom you think might have an interest in books about historical fantasy, the paranormal, Empaths, ghosts or the conspiracy between Big Pharma and the US-FDA.

And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

09 October, 2009

Unique Subject, Uniquely Written - A Five-Star Review by Karen Pio

Unique Subject!! Uniquely Written!!, October 8, 2009
A Five-Star Review By
Karen Pio "Distinguishing Reader" (Southington, CT USA)

Spectacular beginning! Whoa!! I had to quiet myself down, cut off all noise and take everything else out of my head and put it on a shelf when I first read the first line of "Finding Emmaus." Thus I was able to finally concentrate on my third reading of the beginning paragraph. "Did I read that right?" I pondered... What?? WOW!! Who would have thought of such a GREAT "pull-in" to a book? Glasner. Who else? With that, Once I got my head around it, I couldn't put the book down for some time.

Unfortunately, real life stepped in (a big move) and I had to leave the world that
Francis and Katherine were living ... and into the one before us. It was bad... concentrating on my work when this magnetic book pulled on my heart strings to return.

Glasner didn't just get my immediate attention. She has kept that attention and sense of renewal learning more and more about Empaths and the psychiatric community. It has shaken me into being more aware of my surroundings, doctors, medicines for myself and family.

When is the next
Lodestarre?

As a new author, one might wonder how Glasner came upon this subject and how she sought out information, history. Her research is impeccable and her bibliography exemplary. Hmmm, maybe it begins as a novel but it isn't long before you can reach out and touch these people - people who actually lived and died and were misunderstood in the worst way simply because others chose not to pay attention to something, someone other than themselves and their own pocketbooks. Pharmaceutical companies, Be Damned!

Open-mindedness and new worlds explored - THIS is what I'm talking about.

Don't miss your opportunity to read an amazing offering from Glasner - and an opportunity to widen your horizons!

Finding Emmaus is available in the US and the UK through many fine outlets including:
Amazon.com
http://shrvl.com/m351C
Amazon.co.UK
http://bit.ly/Iaz4a
Powell’s
http://shrvl.com/PHI3V
Borders.com
http://shrvl.com/kC6Na
Barnes & Noble
http://shrvl.com/hp5y1
Burgundy Books, East Haddam, CT
http://www.burgundybooks.net/
The Book Depository, UK:
http://shrvl.com/cFQ0W
Booklover’s Gourmet http://www.er3.com/book/


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

04 October, 2009

A Reader's Most Agonizing Predicament

I just received the most amazing compliment about my book, "Finding Emmaus". It was sent to me by Burt Kempner, a filmmaker from Florida. He wrote:

Dear Pamela,

My deepest apologies for not getting back sooner. I was notified late Friday that I have to report to Paris on Wednesday and on top of all that my computer crashed (I'm on a borrowed one now). But I did manage to finish
"
Finding Emmaus" this afternoon.

What a glorious thing you have birthed, Pamela. The characters, the plot, the pacing -- all right on the money. You presented me with a reader's most agonizing predicament: torn between reading each page carefully for the nuggets your research disclosed and wanted to gallop ahead to find out what happens next. That is the storyteller's mission since we gathered around fires to keep sabre-tooth tigers at bay.

A work can be exquisitely written, fraught with symbolic meaning, and if I don't care what happens to the characters, it's a failure. Based on that yardstick, "Finding Emmaus" is a resounding success. You've done fantastically well, and set a very high bar for yourself.

OK, enough flowery tributes. Now get back to work!

Love,
Burt

(Burt Kempner, Filmmaker, Gainesville, Florida)

And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.

Finding Emmaus is available in the US and the UK through many fine outlets including:
Amazon.com
http://shrvl.com/m351C
Amazon.co.UK http://bit.ly/Iaz4a
Powell’s http://shrvl.com/PHI3V
Borders.com http://shrvl.com/kC6Na
Barnes & Noble http://shrvl.com/hp5y1
Burgundy Books, East Haddam, CT http://www.burgundybooks.net/
The Book Depository, UK: http://shrvl.com/cFQ0W

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

28 September, 2009

"Finding Emmaus": an incredible read from the very first page!

Reader Views - Carol Hoyer, PhD
7101 Hwy 71 W #200; Austin, Texas 78735
512-288-8555
http://www.readerviews.com/
admin@readerviews.com

Finding Emmaus (The Lodestarre, Book One)
Pamela S. K. Glasner
Emerald Book Company (2009)
ISBN 9781934572337
Reviewed by Carol Hoyer, PhD, for Reader Views (9/09)


"Finding Emmaus" is such an incredible read from the very first page! If you have ever thought about unique individuals you have come across in your life, then the story involving Katherine and Frank will certainly give you food for thought.

For centuries many individuals have been labeled as being mentally ill and have been treated with experimental drugs, inappropriate treatment and torture. Today, even with all the modern science, we still treat individuals with special talents with lack of concern or interest. The pharmaceutical companies own us- they make millions of dollars off of us and really don’t care if their medications are causing harm.

Francis Nettleton and Katherine Spencer are two such special people who lived over three-hundred years apart, but both were considered to be crazy or lunatics. Neither knew what special talents they had; their mood swings and dark days consumed them and the medical field misdiagnosed them. Each went on a lifelong search to find out why they received the ability to feel others emotions and if there were others like them. Francis had the help and guidance of many in the “special community,” but it took him until he was on his deathbed to finally come to terms with what he had learned and how to help others like him.

Katherine knew there was something different about her, but she couldn’t figure out what it was until a close friend suggested she might not really be mentally ill, but an Empaths. Empaths are individuals who through no choice of their own can tune into others thoughts and feelings in the present and past. Being an Empath is not learned, it is inherited. These individuals like Francis and Katherine are caring, compassionate people. They have the ability to tell if someone is lying or not. Much like Indigo children, these individuals have a purpose on earth.

The author has given readers a wild journey to take with Francis and Katherine. She provides historical data, romance, mystery and an insight into how we as a society now, and in the past, truly view those individuals who have been labeled with mental illness. As readers go on this journey they will learn many things and will come to be saddened and angered at how “unique” individuals are treated. The vivid descriptions of characters, time and place and events will keep readers up all night reading. This reading will certainly make you re-look at your previous thoughts about life and society in general. After reading this one will look at friends, family and acquaintances in a different life and maybe even question if they are an Empath. Very powerful reading and I can’t wait to read the second book.

Pamela Glasner has a unique talent and insight and through her writing shares her knowledge with readers in “Finding Emmaus.”



And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.




Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved


25 September, 2009

World of Prospective Meets Empaths

World-of-Prospective-radio.com will be interviewing me LIVE this coming Tuesday, September 29th @ 6:00PM Pacific Time / 9:00PM Eastern Standard Time / 2:00AM British Summer Time.

We will be talking about Finding Emmaus, Empaths, determining whether the intense emotions you’re experiencing are yours or someone else's - in other words, whether or not your are having an Empathic event.

We will also be discussing ghosts and spirits, mental illness, abuse of human rights, and BigPharma’s collusion with the FDA. You can just listen or you can chat live. If you’d like to chat, you will need to sign up in advance. Follow this link to hear all the pertinent information: http://shrvl.com/8O1Yo

I hope you can join me!

And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.



Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

22 September, 2009

It’s Party Time!

The official release of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series, will be celebrated at a Book Launch Party on October 8th at the Wallingford Public Library from 6:30PM to 8:00PM in the Community Room.

As written on the home page of the
Wallingford Library’s website:

Author Event: Pamela Glasner
Thursday, October 8th at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Room.

Connecticut author Pamela Glasner's first novel, Finding Emmaus: the Lodestarre Book One has just been published. This is your chance to hear about her writing experiences and how Finding Emmaus came to print. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing at the conclusion of the program.

Please register in person,
online, or by phone at (203)265-6754.

I would very much like for all my friends to be there if at all possible to help me celebrate one of the most exciting events of my life.

I would especially like to thank the staff at the Wallingford Library in advance for their interest, generosity and hard work - this promises to be a great night!

And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved




20 September, 2009

Now That’s Weird! Glastonbury Radio - Reprise

It was my great pleasure to be interviewed by world-renowned radio presenter, Ross Hemsworth, this past Friday night, on his show, Now That’s Weird. The topic was my book Finding Emmaus, the unsettling historical fantasy. Our conversation ranged from Empaths to mental illness to the collusion between the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and the out-of-control pharmaceutical industry.

I even got to answer some questions from our listeners, which I loved! The show aired at Friday night, September 18th at 6:00PM EST (that was 6:PM New York City time) and 11:00PM BST (London time). To those who were able to listen to us live, thank you very much. For those who could not, sorry you missed it - it was loads of fun!

The interview in its entirety is here:
http://www.nowthatsweird.co.uk/index1.php (at least, for the time being, until I can figure out a better way to get it onto my blog - I am SO technologically pathetic!!)

(NOTE: If you wish to bypass the intro and the music and get right into the heart of the interview, then fast forward the file to 7:54 minutes into the hour)

And, of course, please don’t forget to visit my website to read the previews of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved


17 September, 2009

Press Release - Sept 17th, 2009

For immediate release
Contact: Publicist, Deborah Riley-Magnus
(310) 637-1424

DARK HISTORICAL FANTASY
AUTHOR PAMELA GLASNER
SPEAKS TO THE MEDIA


September 17, 2009, Hartford, CT – Connecticut author,
Pamela Glasner, speaks in several media venues to promote her first novel, Finding Emmaus, book one of the Lodestarre series. Finding Emmaus, to be released October 1, is a dark fantasy which exposes the contemporary pharmaceutical industry conspiracy, a subject about which she is passionate.

The psychiatric community has confused Empathic personality traits with mental illness with tragic results, leading two EmpathsFrancis Nettleton and Katherine Spencer – who live three hundred years apart, on personal journeys to learn the true nature of Empathy. Transcending time and death to right a centuries-old wrong, they inadvertently uncover a multi-billion dollar conspiracy in which millions of Americans are being misdiagnosed and drugged for no other reason than the enormous income they generate.

Finding Emmaus, is a complex, dark, historic fantasy about human frailties and courage. It is an intricate, meticulously researched, deeply disturbing, suspenseful tale of love and sacrifice, obsession and the abuse of power and the indisputable right of free will. It is a story with an intriguing cast of characters who will keep you guessing as to what they will do and what choices they will make as they weave in and out of the story and each other’s lives.

Ms Glasner’s author events and media exposure currently include:


EVENTS
10/1 - Release of Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series
10/8 - Book Launch party, Wallingford Library, CT
10/13 - Wethersfield-Rocky Hill Rotary Club, Rocky Hill, CT
10/15 - Burgundy Books, East Haddam, CT
11/15 – Essex Books, East Haddam, CT



MEDIA INTERVIEWS
9/13 - Workers Radio Sydney, 88.9FM, Australia
9/18 - "Now That's Weird" Radio Show Interview with Ross Hemsworth, Glastonbury Radio, Glastonbury, England
9/29 - "World of Perspective" Radio Show Interview with Elizabeth Alraune
10/2 – “So Many Books” Television Show with Toni Andrews, CPTV, airing in seven states



ONLINE PROMOTION
Healing Our World
http://shrvl.com/5ymb3
Xanga Blog – Monday Book Promo
http://shrvl.com/5wO0x
Reflection’s Edge - Online Magazine
http://shrvl.com/99414
Whispers of the Muse
http://shrvl.com/vB0kP
Twitter
http://twitter.com/PamelaGlasner
Facebook
http://shrvl.com/58b3n
Finding Emmaus Website
http://www.lodestarre.com/index.html
The Lodestarre: Finding Emmaus Blog
http://lodestarre.blogspot.com/

ONLINE BOOK SALES VENUES
Amazon.com
http://shrvl.com/m351C
Amazon.co.UK
http://bit.ly/Iaz4a
Powell’s
http://shrvl.com/PHI3V
Borders.com
http://shrvl.com/kC6Na
Barnes & Noble
http://shrvl.com/hp5y1
Burgundy Books, East Haddam, CT
http://www.burgundybooks.net/

Ms. Glasner is managed by Publicist, Deborah Riley-Magnus. Finding Emmaus is published by Emerald Book Company, an imprint of Greenleaf Book Group. It is scheduled for release on October 1, 2009, and can be ordered now at the above-noted online book sales venues.

For more information, or to schedule an interview or speaking engagement with the author, please contact, Ms. Magnus at (310) 637-1424. Attachment, book cover.

###

Please don’t forget to see the previews of my book, Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

16 September, 2009

Now That’s Weird, Glastonbury Radio

I am so delighted that I’m going to be Ross Hemsworth’s guest on his radio show Now That’s Weird this coming Friday evening. We will be talking about my book Finding Emmaus, the dark unsettling historical fantasy about empaths, mental illness and the collusion between the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and the out-of-control pharmaceutical industry.

The show airs at 6:00PM EST (that’s New York City time) and 11:00PM BST (that’s London time). If you want to listen to us live, then please go the show’s website which is located at
http://shrvl.com/9430U

Please don’t forget to see the previews of my book, Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series.


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

13 September, 2009

Finding Emmaus has arrived!


If anyone had ever told me I’d consider a UPS truck to be the most the beautiful vehicle in the world, I’d have thought they were nuts. But there I was, standing in my doorway, with a smile on my face that began at the right side of my mouth and wrapped around my head three times before it ended at the left, gazing upon this dark brown truck as if it was about to deliver the Pearly Gates themselves.

Finding Emmaus has finally arrived.

It doesn’t matter that this whole thing began on a frigid wintry morning at a secluded monastery in upstate New York more than a year ago, not any more than it matters that I knew, all during the five months it took me research and write
Finding Emmaus, that this moment would come. I’d been promised an October launch by my publisher and I’d been given a tracking number a week in advance and I’d had ample warning my books were on their way and when the truck was opened and the cases were lifted out, none of that mattered one bit. Nothing - and I mean NOTHING - had prepared me for what it would feel like when I held my book in my hands for the first time.

The psychiatric community has confused Empathic personality traits with mental illness with tragic results, leading two Empaths—Francis Nettleton and Katherine Spencer—who live three hundred years apart, on personal journeys to learn the true nature of Empathy. Finding Emmaus is a meticulously researched, deeply disturbing, suspenseful tale about love and sacrifice, the abuse of power, a multi-billion dollar conspiracy and two ordinary people willing to risk everything to save millions of people who’ve been ostracized from society and victimized because they are mistakenly labeled mentally ill.

You can read a preview of my book, the first three chapters,
here.

Finding Emmaus is now available in the UK through
Amazon, as well as in the US in these fine independent bookstores: Burgundy Books, Essex Books, Powell’s Books.


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved



08 September, 2009

Healing Our World

I am so deeply touched I hardly know what to say - and that’s probably the wrong thing for a writer to say, isn’t it? After all, am I not supposed to be The Woman With The Words? But this one actually - and quite literally - rendered me speechless. Fortunately, not for very long.

On Monday, Sept 7th, my fellow tweeter - yes, ladies and gentlemen, a friendship born of the virtual world of Twitter! - took it upon herself to honor me with a post on her wonderful blog,
Healing Our World.

But this is not just any blog post - this one has heart. And soul. And it moved me deeply. Because she believed that the message of Finding Emmaus was worthy of inclusion in a website dedicated solely to healing humanity. Beautifully formatted in her exceptionally professional-looking blog and with lovely words of her own, Dee Braun, humanitarian, visionary, healer, tweeter, mom, and writer in her own right, told the world about Finding Emmaus.

I've said it before: I'd never really seen myself as an agent for social change, but through Finding Emmaus, wonder of wonders, ready or not, I have become one. And what’s even more stunning to me is that, since the April 3rd, when I posted my very first tweet, I have been graced with introductions to a plethora of amazing women who, like Dee (and, I suppose, like me), passionately want to make this world a better place.

So, while this post of mine is partially meant as a heartfelt thank-you to this remarkable woman, it is also meant as a means to get you to check out her site, her mission, and maybe even spur you to action.


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

04 September, 2009

My Deepest Gratitude to The British Library

To the incomparable staff at the British Library:

I am an American author who wrote an unsettling, meticulously-researched story exposing the conspiracy between the pharmaceutical industry and the US Food and Drug Administration … the latter’s abysmal failure to protect the public at large from the former’s greed and callous disregard for the sanctity of human life.

This blasé attitude is nothing new. The omnipotent have a long, inglorious history of blithely victimizing and marginalizing the one segment of society which most desperately needs help and is the least able to fight for it.

Finding Emmaus travels 350 years back in time to illustrate how we as a society historically and routinely trample the rights of the mentally ill. I never expected to uncover a conspiracy. Rather, I fully intended to illustrate how the mentally ill are disregarded and mistreated, but out of fear and ignorance, not out of malice. Imagine my surprise!

My greatest challenge was locating historic records dating back to the early 1600’s. In the grand scheme of things, US history is relatively young. Early settlers lived day-to-day knowing their survival tomorrow quite literally depended upon every minute they spent today. If they couldn’t make it or grow it or trade with the local tribes for it, they did without it.

That meant they had little time for such discretionary pastimes as writing their memoirs - and of course there no newspapers. So written accounts of the settlers’ lives, their beliefs and values and pre-conceived notions are rare … HERE. But in London, within the extraordinary archives of the British Library, I was able to find scores of books, letters, essays and diaries without which, though my book could certainly have been written, would not be nearly as rich.

Finding Emmaus is a deeply disturbing story about human frailties, the abuse of power and the indisputable human right of free will. The British Library played a significant part in the development of this book and for that I am deeply grateful.



Copyright © 2009 by Pamela S. K. Glasner, All Rights Reserved



03 September, 2009

A Study in Contradictions and Normal as Apple Pie

At 55 years of age, I’m still searching around, trying to figure out just who and what I am and what I’m doing here. All this stuff’s been bouncing around in my head and I’m trying to sort it out, so I thought, “Maybe if you get it down on paper, Pamela, you can make some sense of it.” Maybe …

First and foremost, I love writing. It fills my heart. I’d rather write than do anything else. It’s the greatest gift God has ever given me, only I had no clue ‘til I was 54.

I go to church every week. Makes perfect sense to me: After all the incredible gifts I’ve been given, wouldn’t it just be the height of arrogance and ingratitude to not be willing to give up even one hour out of my life each week to say thanks?

"Finding Emmaus" is a fantasy, but it addresses some very real social issues, nationally and globally. Of course, like any author, I have fantasies of my book flying off the shelves and then having red carpets and rose petals beneath my feet. But what I REALLY want is to be able to look back on my life and know that the fact that I've lived and breathed amounted to something more than simply being here, taking up space and natural resources. If my writing opens the eyes of even a few people long enough to start some serious debate about these critical social issues, then I've succeeded.

Can just one person make a difference? That’s what I’m banking on …

Beyond that, I have the patience of a saint with a canvass and a paintbrush, or paper and pen, but do not suffer fools, gladly or otherwise. I am a deadly negotiator, a no-bullshit business woman who just happens to cry at Harry Potter movies and even G.E. commercials. Anyone who rapes a woman or molests a child should be shot on sight … after being gelded. And yet I believe that people CAN change, that as long as there is breath in someone’s lungs, salvation IS possible. Still haven’t figured out how to reconcile those two…

I love Frank Sinatra and ZZ Top, Vivaldi and Patsy Cline, wintry afternoons in my ‘jammies’ and evenings at the theater, Harry Potter and Humphrey Bogart. Blue flowers make me stop in my tracks and oil paintings of seascapes mesmerize me. “How The Grinch Stole Christmas” is an annual must-see and I never, ever pass up an opportunity to watch “Goodfellas”. I adore cooking for a crowd and serving my guests fine red wine … and when I’m alone in the house, watching an old movie with my cat Maxi curled up around my toes, I just love eating macaroni and cheese.

What I think I've concluded is that, though I know I am a unique being unto myself, the very fact at I am a study in contradictions makes me as normal as apple pie! Whew - thank goodness!



Copyright © 2009 by Pamela S. K. Glasner, All Rights Reserved


02 September, 2009

Conspiracies and Social Networking

On Friday, August 21st, I had the privilege of being interviewed by Shennandoah Diaz, newly-appointed editor of Reflection’s Edge, an online magazine “for thoughtful readers and writers”, which houses fiction and posts articles to “help writers improve their writing.”

Here is that interview: http://shrvl.com/99414

31 August, 2009

The Arrival of Mia Rose


May I present my granddaughter, Mia Rose, just an hour old - my future little empath!

27 August, 2009

CONNECTICUT AUTHOR’S DARK HISTORIC FANTASY EXPOSES CONTEMPORARY PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY CONSPIRACY

.
For immediate release...

August 27, 2009, Hartford, CT – Connecticut author, Pamela Glasner, is proud to announce today that the release of her first novel Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series, is confirmed for October 1, 2009. The novel has been a heart wrenching journey of love for Ms. Glasner, culminating in this triumphant release.

“The only thing worse than having an incomprehensible, incurable illness is having an incomprehensible, incurable illness in isolation”
~ Francis Nettleton, 1739 ~

The psychiatric community has confused Empathic personality traits with mental illness with tragic results, leading two Empaths – Francis Nettleton and Katherine Spencer – who live three hundred years apart, on personal journeys to learn the true nature of Empathy. Transcending time and death to right a centuries-old wrong, they inadvertently uncover a multi-billion dollar conspiracy in which millions of Americans are being misdiagnosed and drugged for no other reason than the enormous income they generate.

Finding Emmaus, book one of the Lodestarre series, is a complex, dark, historic fantasy about human frailties and courage. It is an intricate, meticulously researched, deeply disturbing, suspenseful tale of love and sacrifice, obsession and the abuse of power and the indisputable right of free will. It is a story with an intriguing cast of characters who will keep you guessing as to what they will do and what choices they will make as they weave in and out of the story and each other’s lives.

Ms. Glasner is managed by Publicist, Deborah Riley-Magnus. Finding Emmaus is published by Emerald Book Company, an imprint of Greenleaf Book Group. It is scheduled for release on October 1, 2009, and can be preordered now through Amazon, http://shrvl.com/I35n1.

For more information, or to schedule an interview or speaking engagement with the author, please contact, Ms. Magnus at (310) 637-1424. Attachment: Finding Emmaus cover pdf.

###
.
For more information and updates on the status of Finding Emmaus, which is due out October 1st, please visit http://www.lodestarre.com/FindingEmmaus.html
..
Copyright © 2009 by Pamela S. K. Glasner, All Rights Reserved
.

21 August, 2009

Trying To Turn On The Lights - with Tony Serve and Kevin P Miller

On August 19, 2009, it was my honor and privilege to be interviewed once again by Tony Serve of Perth, Australia, but this time with renowned film producer/director Kevin P. Miller. The audio is entitled: “Big Pharma’s huge profits from human suffering featured in brilliant documentary and awesome new novel, listen to Producer Kevin Miller and author Pamela Glasner”.

I had a wonderful time speaking with these two dedicated and gifted men; they were both brilliant!


I hope you enjoy listening to it.

http://shrvl.com/0UV8I


.

11 August, 2009

Can’t Have A New Life ‘Til You Let Go Of The Old

I cleaned my office this weekend - not vacuuming and dusting, but going through each and every little scrap of paper that was on my desk and, piece by piece, discarding it or filing it. Usually that task would feel arduous, but this time it was easy, almost enjoyable.

Why, I wondered, when I was done? Why did I enjoy it? Why was this time different from any other time?

Was it, I wondered, indicative of what’s to come, of what my life is about to be? Was it symbolic? Was I making room for new “stuff” by letting go of the old?

I was thinking about flying this weekend, how birds do it. I was on my way out to the orchard when a sparrow flew passed me, just above my head, not three feet away, close enough so I could hear the fluttering of his wings and his movement through the air and I remembered that birds have hollow bones, that they have to in order to lift themselves off the ground.

It’s an odd feeling I have as a result of this past weekend’s cleaning, as though I weigh less. I’m not referring to body weight, I’m talking about my heart and soul. I’m talking about a shedding of ‘mass’, a slow and steady casting off, link-by-link, of the Jacob Marley chain I've forged over the course of a lifetime and have hauled around with me since time began.

I don’t know if clearing the clutter out of my house is the reason for this feeling or if this feeling is what precipitated the clearing. Classic chicken and egg. All I know is, I’m getting ready to fly.

I’m not sure if that flying is a spiritual thing or if it’s just something as mundane as getting from point A to point B on a 747 during my upcoming book tour. Perhaps it’s both.

Whatever it is, I find myself embracing it, welcoming it. And that’s a huge change for me (there goes another link from that chain!) because “change” and the “unknown” used to scare the pants off of me. And now here I am, looking forward to it.

I am no longer terrified of it - rather, now I await it’s arrival like a child at a snowy evening windowsill, on the watch for reindeer.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

10 August, 2009

Surviving Cancer Isn’t JUST About Your Body - Not For Me, Anyway


I've been thinking about 17 years ago - imagine that, a full 17 years since I had cancer - when I was in that support group at the Woman’s Health Center in Vernon. The American Cancer Society had sponsored a 16-week class for patients and survivors and their friends and families - anyone, really…

They'd bring in presenters on all kinds of topics: the proper way to walk with a cane, how to use makeup and wigs while going through treatment, planning for death in terms of money and funeral arrangements - you name it, they talked about it. Nothing was off limits.

Occasionally the speaker would be one of us, one of the survivors. And on one particular evening, this one particular woman spoke and now, 17 years later, I can still see her face - her beautiful, healthy, vibrant face, framed by thick, wavy brown hair which she laughingly assured us she had NONE of just two years prior. And I can hear her voice as if it was yesterday.

She’d gone through skin cancer and was telling us about the very first symptom she was aware of: her skin itched. A lot. She told us, “Don’t get nervous, ladies, I’m not talking about the kind of itch you get from a little bit of dry skin. I’m talking about an itch that you couldn’t scratch with a crowbar!” And I remember thinking, in the midst of my fear and my grief and my pain, “Wow, what a great description - sure wish I'd have said something like that.”

And then I scolded myself for thinking that. I mean, here’s this woman standing before us - and there were a lot of us - opening herself up, sharing her innermost feelings about the worst thing that ever happened to her, about one of the worst things that could ever happen to anybody, and I’m sitting there being envious because I’m supposed to be the woman with the words!

Sheesh!!

And then I just imagined this huge hand coming down from the Heavens giving me a “shoulda hadda V-8” slap upside the head, reminding me: it’s OK, Pamela.


When you come that close to facing your own mortality, believe me, you get it: when it comes right down to it, there’s really not all that much that isn't okay.

And there really aren’t that many circumstances in life where a smile, or even a good old-fashioned belly-laugh, is a bad thing.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

03 August, 2009

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DARK HISTORIC FANTASY EXPOSES
CONTEMPORARY PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY CONSPIRACY

August 3, 2009, Hartford, CT – Connecticut author, Pamela Glasner, who originally hails from New York City, announced today that the release of her first novel Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series, is scheduled for October 1, 2009.

“The only thing worse than having an incomprehensible, incurable illness is having an incomprehensible, incurable illness in isolation”
~ Francis Nettleton, 1739 ~


The psychiatric community has confused Empathic personality traits with mental illness with tragic results, leading two Empaths – Francis Nettleton and Katherine Spencer – who live three hundred years apart, on personal journeys to learn the true nature of Empathy. Transcending time and death to right a centuries-old wrong, they inadvertently uncover a multi-billion dollar conspiracy in which millions of Americans are being misdiagnosed and drugged for no other reason than the enormous income they generate.

Finding Emmaus, book one of The Lodestarre Series, is a complex, dark, historic fantasy about human frailties and courage. It is an intricate, meticulously researched, deeply disturbing, suspenseful tale of love and sacrifice, obsession and the abuse of power and the indisputable right of free will. It is a story with a cast of characters who will keep you guessing as to what they will do and what choices they will make as they weave in and out of the story and each other’s lives.

Ms. Glasner is managed by Publicist, Deborah Riley-Magnus, (310) 637-1424. Finding Emmaus is published by Emerald Book Company, an imprint of Greenleaf Book Group. It is scheduled for release on October 1, 2009, and can be preordered now through Ms. Glasner’s blog at http://lodestarre.blogspot.com/.
Finding Emmaus will also be available for preorder in mid-September through Amazon.

For more information, or to schedule an interview or speaking engagement, please contact the author, Ms. Glasner at 860-533-9665.
Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

28 July, 2009

Finding Emmaus - The Video

Twice in this month, I had the pleasure of speaking with Tony Serve of Perth, Australia, a presenter at Radio 6pr (6pr.com). I am awed by Tony’s commitment to the rights and dignity of all those who have been (and are still being) victimized by drug companies - a multinational industry which callously pumps tons of toxic waste into millions of unsuspecting citizens.

Unfortunately, the inappropriately drugged “mentally ill” are not the only victims in this ongoing conflict. For every person who is being misdiagnosed and over-medicated, there are parents and husbands and wives who love them and children who desperately need them, there are sisters and brothers who miss them, there are bosses and co-workers who must deal with lost productivity, there are mounting debts that ordinary citizens wind up paying through increased insurance rates or increased taxes or increased medical charges. One way or another, everybody loses - except the pharmaceutical industry.

In an economic environment where layoffs and firings and downsizings and closings have become the norm, this one industry - with its billion-dollar budget to spread around Washington DC - has increased its bottom line from $12 billion $69 billion in four short years!


The following video is the result of those two conversations I had with Tony:

http://tinyurl.com/mhuyfw


Copyright © 2009 by Pamela S. K. Glasner, All Rights Reserved

The Inalienable Human Right: The Right to BE

Katherine Spencer, Empath, on Patients’ Rights
(an excerpt from Finding Emmaus)

“Maybe, just maybe, it’s time to err in favor of patients’ rights a bit. I don’t know how much you know about the history of mental patient care, but most of what I’ve learned and all of what I’ve experienced would be enough to keep Hollywood up to their ears in horror films for a decade.

“Second only to the very young and the very old, there’s no easier target for abuse than the mentally ill. They have very few defenses and fewer advocates. Many times, particularly when they’re medicated, they have no way to express what’s happening to them, so they can’t even say something as simple as ‘Doctor, I’m having terrible side effects’ or ‘this isn’t working for me’.


Are you aware that as recently as twenty-eight ago, twenty-seven states in this country - our country! - were actively forcing surgical sterilization on Americans who were diagnosed as mentally ill?

And keep in mind: there’s no definitive test for mental illnesses like bipolar disorder. It’s all your doctor’s best guess based on the information available and accepted medical norms at the time. So, what if they were wrong? How many people were sterilized ‘accidentally’?

“Worse than that, a few of the governors of those states, though they have apologized, claim there’s no need to even consider compensation because the victims are mostly dead and, of course, there wouldn’t be any offspring to compensate! They actually said that - using the tragic results of their abuse as a means to evade responsibility. It’s despicable.

“The pendulum will probably swing way too far to this side for a while, but maybe that’s what’s needed - not to endanger anyone - even one more lost life would be a tragedy - but it’s got to stop.”


Copyright © 2009 by Pamela S. K. Glasner, All Rights Reserved



23 July, 2009

Helping Others to Find Human Dignity ... and Shelter From The Storm

I had the pleasure of speaking with Tony Serve a second time regarding "Finding Emmaus', Empathy, Big Pharma and human dignity.

It's all here: http://ow.ly/i0Yw

I can't begin to say how grateful I am that Tony and I have become friends. I just love how passionate he is about my book and the message it's meant to convey.

We spoke of many things: what it's like to be an Empath, what it's like to be erroneously labeled mentally ill, what it's like to be the victim of a political and industrial machine so large and so well-funded that fighting it seems like a lost cause even before you get started.

"Finding Emmaus" is a multi-faceted story with twists and turns and many circuitous paths, but in the end it’s about one thing and one thing only: seeking - and helping others to find - shelter from the storm.

To learn more about Tony and his personal commitment, visit his blog at http://tonyserve.wordpress.com/ or follow him on Twitter @perthtones.


"Finding Emmaus" will be in the bookstores on October 1st and on Amazon.com in mid-September. You can reserve a signed first edition by clicking on the red link to the right.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved


13 July, 2009

Talking About Big Pharma w/ Tony Serve

On Saturday, July 11th, I had the pleasure of speaking with Tony Serve of Perth, Australia, a presenter at Radio 6pr (6pr.com).

We discussed my upcoming book, Finding Emmaus, the pharmaceutical industry’s terrible abuse of those who are tragically labeled mentally ill and governmental agencies which so miserably fail to protect anyone.

I am so very impressed with Tony’s stand on the subject and his commitment to shine a spotlight on this vitally important issue which literally effects millions the world over.

Please follow the link http://tonyserve.wordpress.com then scroll down to Pamela Glasner talks about her new book Finding Emmaus, Empaths, Big Pharma and bi-polar and click on that.

Tony ROCKS!

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

03 July, 2009

Funny thing happened on my way to becoming an author, part one

I was recently asked the question: Aren’t you giving up an intimate part of you when you write?

My answer? Yes and no.

OK … OK … I know … that’s no answer and it sounds like a cop-out. But the truth is, it is yes and no. Maybe I am giving something up. But then again, maybe I’m not.

It doesn’t feel as though I’m losing anything.

To my way of thinking, it’s feels more like digging way down deep inside and accessing it. Certainly, once my words are published, they will be shared with the multitudes - and, God willing, the multitudes will keep up their end of the bargain (my bargain, anyway!) and partake of the sharing - but I never think about that when I'm writing. I never think about what’s going to happen to my words later on.

I think if I gave that part of the process - what it might mean once my readers have my words in their hands and then in their minds and eventually in their discussions with each other … if I stop to consider my audience … I might be inhibited. My writing might be inhibited.

Oh, mercy, I hope that doesn’t sound self-aggrandizing! It’s not meant to. It’s just that I write from a place inside me which is so primal and profound, it’s honestly still a mystery to me.

When I write, I don’t really think about anything. In truth, I've learned that I do my best writing when I get out of my own way, mind my own business and just let it happen … in other words, when I don’t spend too much time thinking about it. When I just let it flow, the story and the characters seem to create themselves. And those seem to be the phrases or the paragraphs or the chapters of the story which move me the most - even when I go back to them several months later.

So, am I losing some intimate part of me? Am I giving something up? I don’t believe so. It never feels like “giving”. It feels more like praying.


Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

15 June, 2009

Rocks, Walls and Epiphanies

A friend of mine, a film producer, recently asked me in an e-mail what was going through my mind when I wrote “Finding Emmaus”. He said, “I meet so many people who confidently tell me that their book or play or film is going to change the world. Invariably their works are boring and pedantic. My take is that we need to tell the best story we possibly can. If, after being exposed to our work, people are inspired to make positive changes in themselves or their communities, great. But that's a happy by-product. Story matters above all.”

People who know me now but did not know me just a few years back may be surprised by this but, prior to this huge ‘epiphany’ of mine nearly two years ago, I was about as unemotional a person as one could get. I didn’t cry at tear-jerker movies and I CERTAINLY never cried in front of anyone - ever. I used to be envious of my friends who COULD cry on their way out of the movie theater, friends who could then tearfully, joyfully, tell the people waiting in line what a wonderful film it was and how much they’d enjoy it.

These same high school friends, and then, later on, my co-workers, firmly believed I was hard as a rock and twice as strong and everyone loved to lean on me ‘cause I never shed a tear. I was the one to go to. I was Wonder Woman, Underdog and The Rock of Gibraltar all rolled into one. I resented, BTW, that everyone automatically assumed I was so strong that I never needed arms around me, but I kept my mouth shut because I was like that.

I clearly recall a time in my late 20’s when an incredulous friend said, “…YOU need help? But Pamela, you’re so strong. It never occurred to me you’d be weak.” One of those memories which pops up occasionally in living color and brings with it anger and resentment in waves.

I was NOT a rock, I was behind a wall. But I had no idea and neither, apparently, did anyone else…

Something changed one day - August 8th 2007 - and I don’t know why. I can remember the exact moment, where I was, what I was doing, and the photograph I was staring at which is now indelibly etched into my brain as the foundation - and the starting point - of this “Dream Quest” I’m on, this path of mine which I am now certain ‘has a heart’ (thank you Don Juan and Carlos Casteneda!).

From that moment on, I've become a different human being. At first, and for a long time thereafter, I thought I was losing my mind. ALL I could do was cry - over anything. A GE commercial could reduce me to a quivering bowl of Jell-O. I still cry easily, but at least now I’m not afraid it’s a sign of impending insanity.

That said, I can now answer Burt’s question.

The only thing on my mind when I created the town and the people of Duncaster / Weavers Bridge, CT, and then the story and then the book “Finding Emmaus” was an almost frenzied need to write it with everything I had in me.

That’s all I knew: just tell the story.

And the way I knew I had written a phrase or a sentence or a paragraph or a chapter just right, the way I knew I had ‘nailed it’, was my emotional response to it as I wrote. If I didn’t cry, I put what I had written aside and started again. And I’m not just talking about the sad or emotional parts of the story - I mean EVERYTHING. If it didn’t touch my heart, even if was only a paragraph to describe how the early Puritans identified which plants they could use to dye their cloth blue, it got rewritten.

I didn’t write “Finding Emmaus” to be famous or change the world or to impress anyone. I wrote it because I HAD to. Seven hundred and fifty pages came pouring out of a part of me I did not know existed and still have yet to locate.

Copyright © 2009, All Rights Reserved

09 June, 2009

What A Piece Of Work Is Man

The process of writing my novel, “Finding Emmāus”, of creating and then developing each and every one of its characters, made me think deeply about what I write, about what is vitally important in my stories, made me truly evaluate what goes on in the deepest, most secretive parts of human personalities, the differences and the nuances from one human to another. Their actions, reactions and interactions with other characters within the story had to be consistent with their personalities throughout the book. I had to learn to really look at what makes people ‘tick’.

And in the process, I learned as much about me as I did about them - perhaps more…


I've always known that life is precious, just as I've always believed human beings to be resilient creatures. But life is also a fragile thing and prior to this time (prior to writing “Finding Emmāus”) I never truly appreciated just how fragile.

I never really thought about what went on inside the walls of a hideous place like Bethlem Royal Hospital in the 17th century, or what the original settlers of this country went through when they lived day to day knowing their survival tomorrow quite literally depended upon every minute they spent today - - if they couldn’t make it or grow it or trade with the Native Americans for it, they did without it.

But I also know this: life, even in its most profoundly tragic moments, gives us a break - as in the way we humans will fondly recount an amusing story about a recently-lost loved one, even at a funeral.

Fragile and resilient, heroic and terrible, determined and pitiable - Hamlet had it right when he said “What a piece of work is man!”


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